It’s been a rough week. Maybe you’re craving a blanket fort and a milkshake, or some kind of Potter-esque spell to make the world more right than it is. Barring that improbability, maybe you check out, which will work for a while. Fortunately, we have plenty of titles for escaping.

Perhaps a healthier and more useful approach is to feel the feels, reflect on what resources we need to manage them, and seek those out. That might take the form of talking with a friend. Or a therapist. Or your cat. Sometimes we need running or napping or crying. There are many ways to build resilience in kids and teens, too, but first they need language for what they are feeling. Then they need to know they are not alone.

Here are 103 books to for emotions and self-care, including some of our favorites:

What is Respect? 

Etan Boritzer’s 14th title in the bestselling ‘What is?’ series on life concepts and difficult topics that help our children develop critical thinking skills and emotional intelligence.

This book helps our children to understand their own self-respect as well as respect for friends, schoolmates and family, respect for religious and cultural diversity and even respect for planet earth. The fun text is filled with questions that stimulate interactive discussion and real insights.

The fun text is filled with questions that stimulate interactive discussion and real insights.

Stuff that Sucks: a Teen’s Guide to Accepting What you can’t change and committing what you can

Sometimes everything sucks. For teens that struggle with negative thoughts and emotions, Stuff That Sucks offers a compassionate and validating guide to accepting emotions, rather than struggling against them.

By helping teens identify their personal values and what really matters to them, this book will help them take steps towards living a more meaningful life.

Rage: True Stories about Teens and Anger

Real Teen Voices Series: writers talk honestly about anger managing as they struggle to gain control of their emotions and stop hurting others and themselves.

Teens open up to tell personal stories that tackle difficult, real-life issues. Direct, revealing, and often raw, these voices will ring true for any teen reader who has faced bullying, anger, or stress. Each piece has been selected and edited to appeal to reluctant and emerging readers as young as seventh grade. Readers will be inspired by the writers’ courage and strength in working hard to overcome problems both large and small.

 

Quiet Power: The Secret Strengths of Introverted Kids

Susan Cain sparked a worldwide conversation when she published Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking. With her inspiring book, she permanently changed the way we see introverts and the way introverts see themselves.

The original book focused on the workplace, and Susan realized that a version for and about kids was also badly needed. This book is all about kids’ world—school, extracurriculars, family life, and friendship. You’ll read about actual kids who have tackled the challenges of not being extroverted and who have made a mark in their own quiet way. You’ll hear Susan Cain’s own story, and you’ll be able to make use of the tips at the end of each chapter. There’s even a guide at the end of the book for parents and teachers. This insightful, accessible, and empowering book, illustrated with amusing comic-style art, will be eye-opening to extroverts and introverts alike.

Mindfulness for Teen Anxiety

It’s hard enough being a teen without having to worry about panic attacks, chronic worry, and feelings of isolation. In Mindfulness for Teen Anxiety, a psychologist offers teen readers proven-effective, mindfulness-based practices to help them cope with their anxiety, identify common triggers (such as dating or school performance), learn valuable time-management skills, and feel calm at home, at school, and with friends.

In Mindfulness for Teen Anxiety, a psychologist offers teen readers proven-effective, mindfulness-based practices to help them cope with their anxiety, identify common triggers (such as dating or school performance), learn valuable time-management skills, and feel calm at home, at school, and with friends.

Cranky & Blue

Everyone feels “down” sometimes. Who wouldn’t feel blue if their best friend moved away or if they were being teased or bullied in school? Counselor and clinical psychologist James J. Crist has written a book that kids can turn to for support, encouragement, and ideas for coping when they feel bad, sad, grumpy, or lonely. Kids learn 10 “Blues Busters” to help shake those unhappy feelings. They also discover lots of ideas they can use to talk about feelings, take care of themselves, boost their self-esteem, make and keep friends, and enjoy their alone time. A special section addresses hard-to-handle problems like grief, roller-coaster feelings, and depression. Includes resources and a Note to Grown-Ups.

 

To purchase titles from this collection, visit Marketplace.

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